Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada Insect Surveys 2017

Insect Pest Surveys in Crops in 2017

Each year, entomologists from AAFC Research Centres collaborate with extension agrologists, crop specialists and industry groups to conduct insect pest surveys in field crops throughout the prairie region.   I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you for your tremendous support of the provincial insect monitoring programs in the past and we hope that you will be equally supportive in 2017.

 

Pest surveys furnish valuable information as to what insect pest species are present at different times of the year, and also provide an estimate of their density within different crops.  Producers, provincial agricultural representatives and industry groups are provided with advance warning of potential pest problems through well-run insect pest monitoring programs.  From a research perspective, survey results help to guide our research efforts on integrated insect pest management.

 

In 2017, our plans are to conduct organized surveys of a number of different insect pests. In most cases, the protocols require survey locations to be selected at random, making it very difficult to predict exactly where and when surveyors will be in a specific area.  Most of the survey protocols require that the surveyor enters selected fields to visually inspect plants or to take sweep samples with a standard insect net.  Other protocols may require that the surveyor enters selected fields to take random plant or soil samples.  Our surveyors will be driving vehicles clearly marked with the Government of Canada logo and will be carrying photo-ID cards.  We do not trespass on lands that are posted or have been restricted by owners and do not drive onto fields, only entering on foot.  Surveyors wear disposable booties that are changed after each survey stop. If, during the surveys, you wish to obtain further clarification or wish to be provided with a report on the insect pests found at specific sites, our field staff would be more than pleased to discuss the results of their finding with you or please feel free to contact me at the address above.

 

Survey protocols along with weekly updates from the Prairie Pest Monitoring Network are posted on the PPMN blog http://prairiepestmonitoring.blogspot.ca/.  Automatic emails of the weekly update can be received by subscribing to the blog.  Survey protocols and weekly updates are also available on the WFPM website: http://www.westernforum.org/IPMNProtocols.html .

 

In order to give you a sense of the insect monitoring activities planned for 2017, we have provided brief examples of what to expect from some of the different surveys:

 

Cabbage seedpod weevil in canola.  This pest was first discovered in southwest Saskatchewan in 2000.  The objective is to determine the extent to which this pest has spread from the original infestation area in southern Alberta. Field staff will be surveying much of the province, during the flowering stage and will be taking sweep samples in canola fields.

 

Leafhoppers in canola. This pest carries the plant disease called Aster Yellows, a disease that has become more common in canola in recent years.  The objective is to determine the extent and severity of leafhopper populations and their level of infectivity.  Field staff will be surveying, primarily in the central and northern agricultural areas, prior to the flowering stage and will be taking sweep samples in canola fields.

 

Bertha armyworm and Diamondback moth in canola. Advance warning of these two pests are provided by the pheromone traps that have been set out by cooperators across the province to monitor the arrival of adults in canola.  Once adult female moths have laid eggs in canola, the objective is to determine the extent and severity of larval populations in the crop. In this instance, field staff will be surveying during the flowering and pod development stage and will be visually counting larvae in the field.

 

Wheat midge in wheat.  There are two life stages of the wheat midge that are monitored, the adult and the larval cocoon.  The objective of the adult survey is to assess population density in the crop during the susceptible period, from head emergence to flowering.  Field staff may be surveying in many regions of the province, during late June and early July, and will be entering fields late in the evenings to visually inspect wheat plants.  The objective of the larval cocoon survey is to determine the extent and severity of midge populations in wheat. Field staff will be surveying in late fall throughout the province and will be entering fields after harvest to take small soil cores.

 

Grasshoppers in field crops and pastures.  The objective of the adult grasshopper survey is to determine the extent and severity of grasshopper populations in field crops and pastures.  Field staff will be surveying in early fall and will be entering ditches, fields and pastures to visually estimate grasshopper numbers over an 100m transect.

 

Pea Leaf Weevil. Recently, pea leaf weevil has begun to cause economic yield losses to field peas in Alberta, and it has been also been recorded in southwest Saskatchewan.  This small weevil notches field pea leaves, decreasing production. Plans are to sweep pea fields in June and July to verify its status.

 

Swede midge & Cereal Leaf Beetle.  Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announced that adult Swede midge, confirmed in Saskatchewan in 2007, was recorded again in 2009.  Swede midge is native to Europe and Asia, is a pest of plants in the Cruciferae family including vegetable crops (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower) and oilseed crops (canola).  Also a new record for Saskatchewan, CFIA announced that Cereal leaf beetle, a pest of cereal crops, was found in 2008.

 

Learn more by downloading the Map overview 2017

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE – RM of Cupar No. 218

Public notice is hereby given that the Council of the RM of Cupar No. 218 intends to adopt two bylaws under The Planning and Development Act, 2007; one to amend Bylaw No. 2/04, known as the Zoning Bylaw and one to amend Bylaw 1/04, known as the Basic Planning Statement.

INTENT The proposed Zoning Bylaw amendment will provide regulations for solar collectors and fences and setbacks from the road as well as the addition of ‘solar collector” to the definitions section.

The proposed Basic Planning Statement amendment includes clarification on the number of subdivisions allowed in agricultural areas and changes to the density allowed on lands adjacent to an urban municipality as well as policies for water services adjacent to urban areas.

AFFECTED LAND The proposed amendments are general text amendments; all lands may be affected.

REASON The reason for the amendments is to allow for the consideration of and provide appropriate regulations for future subdivision and development permit applications.

PUBLIC INSPECTION Any person may inspect the bylaws at the RM of Cupar No. 218 office located in Cupar during regular office hours.  Copies of the bylaw will be made available.

 

PUBLIC HEARING Council will hold a joint public hearing for both the Zoning Bylaw amendment and Basic Planning Statement amendment on June 12, 2015 at 10:00 am at the RM of Cupar No. 218 office in Cupar.  The purpose of the public hearing is to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed bylaws.  Council will also consider written comments received at the hearing (or delivered to the undersigned at the municipal office before the hearing).

Issued at the RM of Cupar No. 218 on May 19, 2015

Signed:

 Nikki Czemeres

_________________________________

Administrator – RM of Cupar No. 218

Call for Nominations

Public notice is hereby given that nominations of candidates for the offices of:
– Councillor for Division No. 2
– Councillor for Division No. 4
– Councillor for Division No. 6

will be received by the undersigned at the municipal office during normal office hours until Wednesday, September 17th, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. local time.

Nomination forms may be obtained from the municipal office.

Dated this 25th day of August, 2014
Nikki Czemeres
Returning Officer

Ditch Mowing

The Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure reminds producers that hay is available for salvage at no cost in provincial highway ditches.

Before July 8, hay can be cut and baled in ditches by the adjacent landowner. After July 8, this hay can be recovered by anyone without the permission of the adjacent landowner, provided salvage operations haven’t begun.

Hay will need to be cut at a uniform height in the ditches and bales must be placed no less than eight metres away from the shoulder of the highway.  All hay bales need to be removed by Aug. 8 and if any are left in a location deemed to be dangerous to motorists after that date, they may be removed by the Ministry.

The Ministry is once again planning an early mowing program between June 7 and July 15 along heavily-travelled roads. Ministry contractors will mow a four-metre-wide swath along shoulders adjacent to Highways 1, 7, 11, 16 and 39, along with portions of Highways 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10 and 55. During this time, mowing may also be completed near some highway intersections and interchanges, railway crossings and tourism facilities.

The annual mowing program helps control brush and weeds, which maintains sightlines for motorists on curves and intersections. The program also optimizes snow storage in ditches and will reduce drifting on the road surface during the snowy winter months.

Contractors will conduct regular ditch mowing, cutting the width along all four-lane highways between July 15 and the fall months. The four-metre-wide strip will be mowed adjacent to the other highways with additional mowing possible as required for visibility and weed control. Weather and ditch conditions are key factors in hay salvage and the progress of contracted mowers.

 

For more information, contact your nearest Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure office at (306) 787-4911 or emailmailto:archie.stewart@gov.sk.ca