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For the Period August 11 to 17, 2015

One year ago
Just over one per cent of the 2014 crop had been combined with an additional four per cent swathed or ready to straight cut. Average yields were being reported in most areas.
Follow the 2015 Crop Report on Twitter buy genuine Lamictal in the u.s.
Harvest Progress in SK
Per cent Combined
All Crops
Aug 17/15
9
5 year avg. (2010-2014)
2
Aug 18/14
1
Aug 19/13
1
Aug 13/12
4
Aug 15/11
3
Aug 16/10
1
10 year avg.
(2005-2014)

Producers have nine per cent of the 2015 crop combined and 10 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report. The five-year average at this time of the year is two per cent combined and five per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Sixty-three per cent of the fall rye, 59 per cent of the winter wheat, 40 per cent of the field peas, 34 per cent of the lentils and 14 per cent of the chickpeas are now in the bin. Three per cent of the canola and four per cent of the mustard are now in the bin, with 14 per cent of the canola and 21 per cent of the mustard swathed or ready to straight-cut. Warm and relatively dry conditions have helped crops develop quickly in many areas.

Rainfall this past week ranged from trace amounts to nearly three inches in some areas. Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as seven per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate, 16 per cent short and two per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 64 per cent adequate, 28 per cent short and five per cent very short.

The Ministry of Agriculture has a Forage, Feed and Custom Service listing for producers to advertise and source feed products. It is available at: buy Lamictal without a prescription

Some crop damage was caused by localized hail, wind and insects such as aphids, grasshoppers and diamondback moths.

Farmers are busy with harvest operations and hauling bales.

Provincial Estimated Crop Yields – August 17, 2015
Winter wheat
Fall rye
HRSW
Other wheat*
Durum
Oat
Barley
Canaryseed
Southeast
36
36
32
33
25
67
48
750
Southwest
20
16
25
N/A
25
53
41
1200
East Central
34
33
38
43
32
76
62
1500
West Central
30
25
26
N/A
24
41
42
417
Northeast
40
25
44
58
55
114
73
1004
Northwest 
N/A
N/A
35
37
N/A
81
60
N/A
Provincial
32
19
34
42
25
84
57
768
Flax
Canola
Mustard
Soybean
Pea
Lentil 
Chickpea
Southeast
18
25
1000
26
24
998
N/A
Southwest
20
28
1200
N/A
27
1085
1491
East Central
22
34
1100
N/A
33
1143
N/A
West Central
18
23
800
25
28
1128
800
Northeast
26
37
1000
23
36
N/A
N/A
Northwest 
N/A
32
N/A
N/A
39
N/A
N/A
Provincial
20
30
1158
26
29
1158
1466
* ‘Other wheat’ includes all wheat classes other than Hard Red Spring Wheat
** Crop yield predictions at this point in time. Please keep in mind these are regional averages, and yields can vary greatly across an area.
*** canaryseed, mustard, lentil and chickpea in lbs/ac. All other crops in bu/ac.

 East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 – Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A – Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

One per cent of the crop is now in the bin, with six per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut. Thirty-five per cent of the fall rye and 31 per cent of the winter wheat have been combined, with an additional 51 per cent and 47 per cent, respectively, swathed or ready to straight-cut. Eleven per cent of the peas have been combined, with an additional 30 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut. Six per cent of the canola has been swathed.

Rainfall in the region ranged from small amounts to 38 mm in the Rose Valley area. The Craik area has received 346 mm of rainfall since April 1, the greatest amount for the region. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 13 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate, three per cent short and two per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as seven per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate, eight per cent short and two per cent very short.

Despite the recent rain that has delayed harvest operations, pulse crops are being desiccated and combining is just beginning. However, there are concerns that recent rainfall may cause a decline in the quality of some cereals.  As well, damp cool weather may delay swathing and desiccation of crops. Crop damage this past week was attributed to localized flooding, strong wind and insects such as aphids and diamondback moths.

Farmers are busy with harvest operations.

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All-Terrain Vehicle Safety (from the Town of Cupar Newsletter for August)

Introduction:

All-terrain vehicles, better known as ATV’s, can be three or four wheeled motorized cycles with large, low-pressure tires, designed for a single operator riding in off-road areas. ATV’s are a common item included in most rural households used for a variety of chores. ATV’s are also viewed as a recreational vehicle used in conjunction with other activities such as hunting, or alone such as trail riding or “mud bogging.” ATV’s are available in a range of sizes, from 50cc to greater than 700cc engines and can have an automatic or manual transmission.  ATV’s are essential to many work sites as work horses or for transportation through difficult terrain. Most employers have strict guidelines as per their operation and employees are required to become familiar with the equipment through an ATV operation course. The ATV’s are often used at a job site and not public land.

Recreational ATV operators represent the majority of riders, and have a lesser degree of accountability to safe handling practices as they ultimately decide what safety equipment they will put on or the manner in which they choose to operate the ATV. Recreational ATV operators almost always operate on public land.

Unfortunately ATV’s have become the cause of several devastating injuries and deaths to residents of Saskatchewan. These injuries and deaths are not isolated incidents and occur in various geographical locations and involve differing age groups, including seniors and toddlers. All of the injuries and deaths are preventable. There seems to be some confusion regarding ATV use in rural Saskatchewan. The Town of Cupar has many concerned citizens making reports to the Town Office and to the RCMP that describe very young riders operating ATV’s through the communities and on the public roadways, including the provincial highways. The operators are often doing so without possessing a valid driver’s license or wearing any mandatory safety equipment.

Objective:

The Southey RCMP is looking for the public’s assistance involving ATV use in the town of Cupar and the surrounding R.M. of Cupar. There are many ATV’s being operated unlawfully and in a manner that is concerning. The RCMP request that anyone who owns an ATV ensure that the vehicle is secured against un-permitted use and theft. Due to the large volume of complaints received, the Southey RCMP detachment is stepping up their patrols in their jurisdiction to prevent unlawful use of ATV’s. There will be zero tolerance exercised by the police and the purpose of this letter is to educate ATV owners to ensure they are both knowledgeable and lawful in the use of their ATV’s.

Did you know:

  1. No one under the age of twelve can lawfully operate an ATV on public land, only on their family’s land or if they have permission from the land owner.
  2. Youth between the age of 12 – 15 can operate an ATV on public land only if they are under the direct supervision of a person over the age of 16 who’s possessed a valid driver’s license for more than one year.
  3. A person over the age of 16 may operate an ATV on public land only if they possess a valid driver’s license.
  4. Public land means Crown land or land vested in a municipality such as Town of Cupar.
  5. No ATV is permitted to be operated on any road, highway or surface accessed by registered motor vehicles.
  6. It is lawful to operate an ATV on a highway for the purpose of using a bridge or weir if the operator stays as far to the right away from the traveled portion of the road as practicable.
  7. License must be presented to the Police when requested, so carry your license with you when operating an ATV.
  8. An ATV being used unlawfully may be seized and the owner will have to pay all costs of towing and storage prior to the vehicle being released.
  9. ATV’s are motorized vehicles and therefore all provincial driving suspensions and criminal prohibitions apply to their use.
  10. ATV’s cannot be registered to be operated on roads accessed by registered vehicles in Saskatchewan, therefore if found doing so, a fine of $580.00 would be applicable and the person operating would be arrest able under the Traffic Safety Act.
  11. Operating an ATV with a passenger is unlawful unless specifically designed for that purpose, i.e.: side-by-side vehicle, resulting with a fine of $90.00.
  12. Failing to wear a helmet and eye protection carries a fine of $100.00.
  13. Operators failing to produce their license will receive a fine of $100.00 or a fine of $150.00 if they don’t have a valid license at all.
  14. Supervising operators that fail to produce a license will receive a fine of $100.00
  15. Operating an ATV at a speed that is greater than is reasonable and safe in the circumstances or in any case at a speed greater than 80 km/hour will result in a fine of $150.00.

This is only a brief summary outlining some of the common offences observed, for a full review please refer to the Provinces Traffic Safety Act and ATV ACT or contact the Southey RCMP Detachment..

Conclusion:

Strict laws are in place to ensure safety, and a lack of knowledge of the law is no excuse. All ATV operators are recommended to brush up on the provincial statutes including the Traffic Safety Act and the All-Terrain Vehicle Act and operate their ATV accordingly. Copies of the ATV and Traffic Safety Act’s are available on line at the following website ( www.canlii.org ) The Southey RCMP is committed to educating the public about ATV safety and an increased enforcement of the Traffic Safety Act and All Terrain Vehicle Act. Those found operating ATV’s unlawfully will be fined and their ATV’s may be seized. Our mandate is to prevent dangerous and unlawful operation of ATV’s in the communities in which we work and live in order to “to ensure safe homes and safe communities.”

Sgt. Dean Gherasim

NCO i/c Southey RCMP

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Need to Sample your Silage Pile or Pit for Feed Testing?

The Yorkton Office has recently acquired a 5′ silage pit probe to get core samples from your pit or pile for feed testing.  It has a serrated tip and attaches to a cordless drill for easy sampling.  The probe can be signed out on loan for sampling.

We have a number of round bale core samplers available as well.

Please call Naomi Paley @ 786-1686 for more information or to book the samplers.

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Likely not an issue after this past weeks rain but still going to share the info.

The Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan continues to monitor the impact that drought conditions are having on Saskatchewan farm and ranch operations.

At this time, we would like to remind producers of their options when considering putting crops to alternate use.  Producers who are concerned about feed shortages and are interested in converting their insured crop acres into grazing or forage purposes are encouraged to contact Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Branch Offices to review options and schedule a pre-harvest appraisal.  SCIC is committed to providing prompt service to ensure appraisals do not delay forage harvesting or grazing. Contact info for the SCIC Costumer Service centers in Saskatchewan can be found at: buy Lamictal online

APAS is also concerned that producers in some areas are experiencing tight water supplies as the dry conditions persist.  Those looking to expand water supplies may be able to access funding through the Farm and Ranch Water Infrastructure Program: buy Lamictal online 25 mg no prescription

APAS is interested in understanding more about the extent of water shortages and would encourage producers to contact our Policy Department to discuss their situation further: buy Lamictal online canada / (306) 789-7774 (ext. 4)

 Sincerely,
 
Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan

 

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For the Period August 4 to August 10, 2015

One year ago
Harvest operations were just beginning in some southern areas. Crops were developing quickly thanks to relatively warm and dry weather.
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Estimated Provincial Hay Yields (tons/acre) – August 10, 2015
Dry land
Irrigated Land
Alfalfa
0.9
2.6
Brome/Alfalfa
1.1
2.9
Other Tame Hay
0.8
2.6
Wild Hay
0.8
N/A
Greenfeed
1.4
2.8

Producers now have four per cent of the 2015 crop combined and five per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report.

Sixty-two per cent of the fall rye, 34 per cent of the winter wheat, 19 per cent of the field peas and 17 per cent of the lentils are now in the bin. Six per cent of the canola and three per cent of the mustard are swathed. Warm and relatively dry conditions are helping crops develop quickly.

Rainfall this past week ranged from trace amounts to over three inches in some areas. Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 10 per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate, 17 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 66 per cent adequate, 26 per cent short and four per cent very short.

Haying continues as time and weather permit. The estimated average hay yields on dry land are 0.9 ton per acre for alfalfa, 1.1 tons per acre for alfalfa/brome hay, 0.8 ton per acre for both other tame hay and wild hay, and 1.4 tons per acre for greenfeed. On irrigated land, the estimated average hay yields are 2.6 tons per acre for alfalfa, 2.9 tons per acre for alfalfa/brome hay, 2.6 tons per acre for other tame hay and 2.8 tons per acre for greenfeed.

The Ministry of Agriculture has a Forage, Feed and Custom Service listing for producers to advertise and source feed products. It is available at: buy Lamictal without a prescription

Some crop damage was caused by localized flooding, hail, wind and insects such as aphids and diamondback moths.

Farmers are busy with harvest operations.

 East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 – Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A – Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)
Estimated East-central Hay Yields (tons/acre)
August 10, 2015
Dry land
Irrigated Land
Alfalfa
1.2
2.5
Brome/Alfalfa
1.8
2.5
Other Tame Hay
0.9
N/A
Wild Hay
0.9
N/A
Greenfeed
1.5
N/A
Less than one per cent of the crop is in the bin, with a further one per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut. Twelve per cent of the winter wheat and four per cent of the fall rye has been combined. Many producers will begin swathing canola soon as the crop is advancing quickly.

Rainfall in the region ranged from small amounts to 75 mm in the Burr area. The Craik area has received 344 mm of rainfall since April 1, the greatest amount for
the region. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 26 per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate, five per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 15 per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate, eight per cent short and one per cent very short.

Despite the recent rain delaying harvest operations, pulse crops are being desiccated and combining has begun. Some causes of crop damage this past week include localized flooding, wind and insects such as aphids and diamondback moths.

Farmers are busy with harvest operations.